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Red Sox Rookie Andrew Benintendi Suffers Left Knee Sprain In Game Against Rays

The Boston Red Sox might have suffered a big loss against the Tampa Bay Rays during Wednesday nights game with rookie outfielder Andrew Benintendi suffering a left knee sprain while running the bases.

Boston Red Sox Rookie Outfielder Andrew Benintendi Suffered Left Knee Injury While Running The Bases

The Boston Red Sox might have suffered a big loss against the Tampa Bay Rays during Wednesday nights game with rookie outfielder Andrew Benintendi suffering a left knee sprain while running the bases.

This is what happened, Andrew Benintendi was on second base, when Dustin Pedroia grounded a ball to Rays shortstop Matt Duffy. In an attempt to avoid the tag from Duffy, Benintendi appeared to get his left cleat caught in the dirt, resulting in the bending what appeared to be the rookie’s left knee.

The Red Sox announced Benintendi suffered a left knee sprain and would be further evaluated Thursday. Benintendi stayed on the ground until Red Sox manager John Farrell and trainer Brad Pearson could arrive to look at the player, who was on his knees near second base. The outfielder would ultimately be helped off the field, putting his weight on both Farrell and Pearson.

The injury of Benintendi comes at a time where the Red Sox have just had Chris Young return from injury to rejoin the outfield group. Having Young back with the addition of Benintendi creates a very deep bench for the Red Sox outfield. Losing Benintendi for any period of time hurts, he was batting over .300 since joining the big league club, and his presence was being felt both in the lineup and on the field.

Below are the timetable for the three degrees of knee sprain injuries if Benintendi did indeed sprain his left knee:

  1. A mild or (grade I) sprain, Tearing of some ligament fibers. There is no loss of function. 2-6 weeks
  2. A moderate or (grade II) sprain, which is a rupture of a portion of the ligament, resulting in some loss of function 6-8 weeks
  3. A severe or (grade III sprain), which is a complete rupture of the ligament or complete separation of ligament from bone. There is a total loss of function. A severe sprain may require surgical repair. 8 weeks to 10 months

 

 

 

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About Tanner Rebelo (178 Articles)
Founder and Chief of Content for Trifecta Network.

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